Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 40

Thread: Routing vacuum lines.

  1. #1
    Member verified Feedback Score 2 (100%) blindmist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since
    Aug 15, 2005

    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    698
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 45 Times in 28 Posts

    Routing vacuum lines.

    So how do most of you people run a vac line to the a pillar without it getting smashed in the door?

  2. #2
    Member verified
    supporter
    Feedback Score 0 DocWalt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since
    Oct '08 - Oct '10

    Location
    Royersford, PA
    Posts
    3,500
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 393 Times in 276 Posts
    Up through the hole in the dash and behind the A-pillar. There's enough space.
    R135
    ╚╬╬╝
    - 24

  3. #3
    Not A DSM verified Feedback Score 3 (100%) Polygon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since
    June 2006

    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    396
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Yep, it's easy.

    On a related note. What do you guys do with that damn hard booster line next to the Y-pipe besides delete it?

  4. #4
    Member verified
    supporter
    Feedback Score 0 DocWalt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since
    Oct '08 - Oct '10

    Location
    Royersford, PA
    Posts
    3,500
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 393 Times in 276 Posts
    Mine's still there. I like the feel of the clutch, I don't want to change it.

  5. #5
    Not A DSM verified Feedback Score 3 (100%) Polygon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since
    June 2006

    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    396
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Neither do I. I want to keep it, I just don't want to see it. It's such a stupid way to route that. I would imagine that it doesn't have to be a hard line?

  6. #6
    Member verified
    supporter
    Feedback Score 0 DocWalt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since
    Oct '08 - Oct '10

    Location
    Royersford, PA
    Posts
    3,500
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 393 Times in 276 Posts
    It doesn't need to be, but I'd imagine a rubber line that long would start wanting to collapse.

  7. #7
    Not A DSM verified Feedback Score 3 (100%) Polygon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since
    June 2006

    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    396
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    That's my only concern. I guess I could easily just get some hard line in that size and just bend it up and route it out of sight.

  8. #8
    Member verified
    supporter
    Feedback Score 0 DocWalt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since
    Oct '08 - Oct '10

    Location
    Royersford, PA
    Posts
    3,500
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 393 Times in 276 Posts
    I was going to suggest that next Make sure you flare the ends if you do that.

    There's a trick to not allow rubber lines to collapse, if you wanted to try that. Just shove a spring of appropriate size in to the locations where it's going to bend. It will allow it to flex, but not collapse.

  9. #9
    XLR8TOR Feedback Score 0
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since

    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    166
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
    Filling it with sand would also prevent collapse but then that's not really a viable solution is it.

    There is hose available that is very thick walled such that you probably could not collapse it with a pair of channel locks. Ask at a good parts store and show them what the original is. I found something like that to replace the clutch vacuum line on my Fiances '93. The line has a sort of cloth wrapping around it but I don't know what kind it is. Also make sure you have the one way valve inside unless you have an NA engine. Make sure the line has the same ID as the original.

    Cut the old valve out carefully so you don't damage it.

    You can insert the old valve inside of a new rubber hose by finding a bold that fits inside of the hose [used to push the valve back inside] and make a mark on the bolt for depth control. Then put the end of the hose in some boiling water for several seconds until it is soft then insert the valve and press it flush then stand the bolt upright and press the hose down onto the bolt and press the valve in [probably about 1 1/2 inches]. Make sure you get the valve in the right way or it will not work. Once in just run some cold water on the hose to harden it back up. Works like a charm.

  10. #10
    Not A DSM verified Feedback Score 3 (100%) Polygon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Owner Since
    June 2006

    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    396
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Some clever ideas. About the check valve, which section of line is it? I just want to replace the hard section that runs along the side of the Y-pipe. At least for now.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
3000GT / Stealth / GTO Resources
3000GT / Stealth / GTO / Multi-site Classifieds
3000GT/Stealth/GTO Event Pages
3S National Gathering
East Coast Gathering
Upper Mid-West Gathering
Blue Ridge Gathering
3000GT/Stealth/GTO Clubs and Groups
Michigan 3S
MInnesota 3S
Wisconsin 3S
Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas 3S
North California 3000GT/Stealth
United Society of 3S Owners
3000GT/Stealth/GTO Forums
3000GT/Stealth International
3000GT/Stealth/GTO Information and Resources
Team 3S
3000GT / Stealth / GTO Information
daveblack.net
The 3000GT/Stealth/GTO Web History Project
3000gt.com
3000GT / Stealth International WWWboard Archive