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Thread: Aluminum Block? Thoughts?

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    Aluminum Block? Thoughts?

    I was just thinking today that I think it would be kind of neat to see a block from aluminum. It could be expensive. That I could see too. But I think the mustang has a aluminum block with Iron electrically deposited on the cylinder walls so it is "just as strong" as a iron block.

    Primarily the weight savings is what I was thinking, and you wouldn't have to make a front sub frame to reduce the weight.


    Does anyone have any good links to the casting of a block? I dont seem to have good luck on youtube. I am curious as to how it is done.

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    Forum User Feedback Score 0 mikeyVR4's Avatar
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    Not sure if I ever heard of a aluminum block for a VR4 before...

    If weight reduction is your reasoning, I would suggest doing other alternatives as a aluminum block will end up being a TON.

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    Forum User verified Feedback Score 1 (100%) thor'svr4's Avatar
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    the block itself is not to heavy so i doubt the weight savings would be much. ive heard on BBC, old mopars ect that swaping in an alu block can save ~100 lbs ( i think it was on spike's muscle car ) but one person can easily pick up and walk around with a vr4 block. when i built my motor i didnt have a engine puller so i literaly just lifted my whole short block out of the engine bay by hand and walked it though my basement to the work bench. it wasnt to heavy, just ackword with lots of sharp edges lol

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    1st ever COTM and COTY verified Feedback Score 9 (100%) green-lantern's Avatar
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    Man vs 3/S verified Feedback Score 6 (100%) R/T93's Avatar
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    Umm, it would probably cost you like half a million dollars to get the equipment to be able to cast and final machine an aluminum engine block....

    There are more economial ways to save weight, wheels, driveshaft, seats, carbon fiber hatch fenders and doors. All that stuff is worth like 3-400 lbs maybe more.

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    I was just thinking. Mostly on how the casting is done, then it spawned into this. I have seen a vid on the CNC of a block from raw material. But how do they get all the passages and stuff in a cast block? Like the water ways. You can look in a freeze plug hole and it is a empty space with a cylinder wall on the other side. all nice and curved too.

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    Forum User verified Feedback Score 1 (100%) thor'svr4's Avatar
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    wow thats really impressive

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    Quote Originally Posted by EvanH View Post
    I was just thinking. Mostly on how the casting is done, then it spawned into this. I have seen a vid on the CNC of a block from raw material. But how do they get all the passages and stuff in a cast block? Like the water ways. You can look in a freeze plug hole and it is a empty space with a cylinder wall on the other side. all nice and curved too.
    They have to make it in sections, kind of. THey use hardened sand molds and stuff it inside the molten metal, as the metal hardens the sand is still there, a void is created. When the casting cools they can just break all the sand pieces and clean it out and viola, a water jacket is there. Its obviously much more complicated than that but I hope you get the idea.

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    It kind of helps. Makes me more curious too. I will keep looking. Thanks!

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    Seeing that our blocks are damn near bullet proof, I see no reason to change them. Especially at the high cost of new forgings/tooling.

    -Chris

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